The Frying Scotsman

Authentic British fish and chips, served from a food truck

Amazing food. Best fish and chips I've ever had. The crunch was out if this world! It really tickled the taste buds!

Hf F. on

Decided to write a review following "doros" review. -Expensive $10 for fresh cod, haddock etc? Get real. If you want your cheap quality fish buy ...

Marl S. on

By far the best fish and chips I've had in my life thus far. The breading was perfect and it didn't taste greasy where you ...

Jackie Hien P. on

Our Story

Growing up in small coastal town near Glasgow, Scotland, James King never thought someday he’d be in the United States running his own “chippy,” the British term for a fish and chip shop. He did know by age 10, however, that he would be a professional chef.
While attending chef’s college in Ayr, Scotland, he discovered that handmade sauces were his specialty, and that he had a knack for enhancing meats with a simple reduction or by heating mixtures of flour, butter, water and spices. By his mid- twenties, the lure of good money landed him a job as a chef manager on an oilrig where he managed a team of chefs who cooked four meals a day for oil workers. He worked in the chilly waters of the North Sea, off the shore of Aberdeen and even closer to Norway. Two decades later, in 2006 King met a girl from Portland visiting the UK, and his interest was piqued by her description of a place with a climate identical to his hometown.
When he visited Portland, he found Oregon’s coastline to be very similar to that of western Scotland, but Portland boasted one thing that’s hard to find in the UK—a 10,000-foot mountain promising a winter wonderland accessible in 60 minutes or less.
A trailer showed up on Craig’s List one Saturday, and James put a deposit down and waited out the weekend. A quick search found that the sellers’ criminal history was less than spotless, and King made multiple trips to the DMV on Monday. Everything checked out, and by Tuesday, the trailer was his.
James’ mother-in-law, a 3rd generation Portlander made her warehouse on NW 22nd and Raleigh available for James to try out his venture. Nestled in the garage and sharing the street with two other carts, the area was dubbed “a little food cart nexus” by the leader in food cart review and commentaryFoodCartsPortland.com. http://foodcartsportland.com/2009/10/07/the-frying-scotsman-fish-and-chips/ ) Named The Frying Scotsman, www.thefryingscotsmanpdx.com is now at SW 9th and Alder, downtown Portland.
James mixes his own tartar sauce and coleslaw daily and sources his fish from Pacific Seafood and his British bangers from Zenner’s. He hand-cuts up to 150 lbs of locally sourced potatoes each morning.

Accepts Cards
Accessible
Kid Friendly
Street Parking

Reach us

Phone

(503) 706-3841

Address

SW 9th Ave & SW Alder St, Portland, OR 97205

Operating Hours

Closed
Mon-Fri
11:00 am - 4:00 pm
Today
11:30 am - 3:00 pm
Sun
Closed
Get directions

Our Story

Growing up in small coastal town near Glasgow, Scotland, James King never thought someday he’d be in the United States running his own “chippy,” the British term for a fish and chip shop. He did know by age 10, however, that he would be a professional chef.
While attending chef’s college in Ayr, Scotland, he discovered that handmade sauces were his specialty, and that he had a knack for enhancing meats with a simple reduction or by heating mixtures of flour, butter, water and spices. By his mid- twenties, the lure of good money landed him a job as a chef manager on an oilrig where he managed a team of chefs who cooked four meals a day for oil workers. He worked in the chilly waters of the North Sea, off the shore of Aberdeen and even closer to Norway. Two decades later, in 2006 King met a girl from Portland visiting the UK, and his interest was piqued by her description of a place with a climate identical to his hometown.
When he visited Portland, he found Oregon’s coastline to be very similar to that of western Scotland, but Portland boasted one thing that’s hard to find in the UK—a 10,000-foot mountain promising a winter wonderland accessible in 60 minutes or less.
A trailer showed up on Craig’s List one Saturday, and James put a deposit down and waited out the weekend. A quick search found that the sellers’ criminal history was less than spotless, and King made multiple trips to the DMV on Monday. Everything checked out, and by Tuesday, the trailer was his.
James’ mother-in-law, a 3rd generation Portlander made her warehouse on NW 22nd and Raleigh available for James to try out his venture. Nestled in the garage and sharing the street with two other carts, the area was dubbed “a little food cart nexus” by the leader in food cart review and commentaryFoodCartsPortland.com. http://foodcartsportland.com/2009/10/07/the-frying-scotsman-fish-and-chips/ ) Named The Frying Scotsman, www.thefryingscotsmanpdx.com is now at SW 9th and Alder, downtown Portland.
James mixes his own tartar sauce and coleslaw daily and sources his fish from Pacific Seafood and his British bangers from Zenner’s. He hand-cuts up to 150 lbs of locally sourced potatoes each morning.

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Accepts Cards
Accessible
Kid Friendly
Street Parking

Customers love us

Amazing food. Best fish and chips I've ever had. The crunch was out if this world! It really tickled the taste buds!

Hf F. on

Decided to write a review following "doros" review. -Expensive $10 for fresh cod, haddock etc? Get real. If you want your cheap quality fish buy ...

Marl S. on

By far the best fish and chips I've had in my life thus far. The breading was perfect and it didn't taste greasy where you ...

Jackie Hien P. on